Sep 042012
 

With the exception of Google Fiber, the United States isn’t exactly breaking records when it comes to high-speed Internet policy. The National Broadband Plan, which was released two years ago, says that there should be a minimum level of service of at least 4Mbps for all Americans. Since then, not much has happened.

But across the pond in Ireland, Communications Minister Pat Rabbitte, has recently decided that that’s not nearly enough.

On Thursday, he outlined a new broadband plan for Ireland that puts the United States to shame. He says that half the population, largely in the urban and suburban cores, should have speeds of 70Mbps to 100Mbps, with service of at least 40Mbps to the next 20 percent of the country. Finally, hewrites, there should be a “minimum of 30Mbps for every remaining home and business in the country—no matter how rural or remote.”

The measure in Ireland is part of the European Union’s Digital Agenda for Europe, which, among other things, requires member states to publish national broadband plans by the end of the year to bring a minimum level of 30Mbps service to all citizens by 2020.

MORE:  Ireland calls for minimum Internet speeds of 30Mbps | Ars Technica.

 


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